When a node is mirrored, the origin is automatically moved to the top right corner causing the node to layout children and draw from right to left using a mirroring transformation. Some nodes may wish to draw from right to left without using a transformation.

These nodes will will answer false and implement right-to-left orientation without using the automatic transformation. This method is commonly overridden by subclasses to implement attributes that are required for a specific role. If a particular attribute is not handled, the super class implementation must be called.

All rights reserved. Skip navigation links. Object javafx. Node javafx. Shape javafx. Creates an instance of Text on the given coordinates containing the given string. The 'alphabetic' or roman baseline offset from the Text node's layoutBounds. This method should delegate to Node. This method is called by the assistive technology to request the value for an attribute.

java.awt.Font : Font « 2D Graphics « Java Tutorial

Determines whether a node should be mirrored when node orientation is right-to-left. Defines the origin of text coordinate system in local coordinates. Note: in case multiple rows are rendered VPos. TOP define the origin of the top row while VPos. Determines how the bounds of the text node are calculated. Logical bounds is a more appropriate default for text than the visual bounds.The Font class represents fonts, which are used to render text on screen.

Given that fonts scale with the rendering transform as determined by the transform attributes of a Node using the Font and its ancestors, the size will actually be relative to the local coordinate space of the node, which should provide coordinates similar to the size of a point if no scaling transforms are present in the environment of the node.

Note that the real world distances specified by the default coordinate system only approximate point sizes as a rule of thumb and are typically defaulted to screen pixels for most displays.

String getFamily Returns the family of this font. String getName The full font name. String getStyle The font specified string describing the style within the font family. String toString Converts this Font object to a String representation. The underlying font used is determined by the implementation based on the typical UI font for the current UI environment. Returns: The default font. This call has performance considerations as looking up all of the fonts may be an expensive operation the first time.

Returns: The list containing all available font families. Returns: The list containing all available fonts. Returns: The list containing the fonts for the given family. This method is not guaranteed to return a specific font, but does its best to find one that fits the specified requirements.

A null or empty value for family allows the implementation to select any suitable font. Parameters: family - The family of the font weight - The weight of the font posture - The posture or posture of the font size - The point size of the font. This can be a fractional value, but must not be negative. If the size is Returns: The font that best fits the specified requirements. Parameters: family - The family of the font weight - The weight of the font size - The point size of the font.

Parameters: family - The family of the font posture - The posture or posture of the font size - The point size of the font.

8- Java iText - Font and Color

Parameters: family - The family of the font size - The point size of the font. Parameters: family - The family of the font Returns: The font that best fits the specified requirements. Parameters: size - The point size of the font. This name includes both the family name and the style variant within that family. For example, for a plain Arial font this would be "Arial Regular" and for a bolded Arial font this would be "Arial Bold". The precise name to use when loading a font is defined within each font file as the full font name.

A null or empty name allows the implementation to select any suitable font. There is a single unified way to load all of application supplied via Font. Simply create the font by specifying the full name of the font you want to load. If the specific font cannot be located, then a fallback or default font will be used.

java 8 font

The "name" will be updated to reflect the actual name of the font being used.A glyph is a shape used to render a character or a sequence of characters. In simple writing systems, such as Latin, typically one glyph represents one character.

java 8 font

In general, however, characters and glyphs do not have one-to-one correspondence. On the other hand, the two-character string "fi" can be represented by a single glyph, an "fi" ligature. In complex writing systems, such as Arabic or the South and South-East Asian writing systems, the relationship between characters and glyphs can be more complicated and involve context-dependent selection of glyphs as well as glyph reordering. A font encapsulates the collection of glyphs needed to render a selected set of characters as well as the tables needed to map sequences of characters to corresponding sequences of glyphs.

Physical and Logical Fonts The Java Platform distinguishes between two kinds of fonts: physical fonts and logical fonts. Physical fonts are the actual font libraries containing glyph data and tables to map from character sequences to glyph sequences, using a font technology such as TrueType or PostScript Type 1.

All implementations of the Java Platform must support TrueType fonts; support for other font technologies is implementation dependent. Physical fonts may use names such as Helvetica, Palatino, HonMincho, or any number of other font names. Typically, each physical font supports only a limited set of writing systems, for example, only Latin characters or only Japanese and Basic Latin.

The set of available physical fonts varies between configurations. Applications that require specific fonts can bundle them and instantiate them using the createFont method.

Logical fonts are the five font families defined by the Java platform which must be supported by any Java runtime environment: Serif, SansSerif, Monospaced, Dialog, and DialogInput. These logical fonts are not actual font libraries. Instead, the logical font names are mapped to physical fonts by the Java runtime environment. The mapping is implementation and usually locale dependent, so the look and the metrics provided by them vary.

Typically, each logical font name maps to several physical fonts in order to cover a large range of characters. For a discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of using physical or logical fonts, see the Internationalization FAQ document. Font Faces and Names A Font can have many faces, such as heavy, medium, oblique, gothic and regular. All of these faces have similar typographic design.

There are three different names that you can get from a Font object. The logical font name is simply the name that was used to construct the font. The font face nameor just font name for short, is the name of a particular font face, like Helvetica Bold. The family name is the name of the font family that determines the typographic design across several faces, like Helvetica. The Font class represents an instance of a font face from a collection of font faces that are present in the system resources of the host system.

There can be several Font objects associated with a font face, each differing in size, style, transform and font features. The getAllFonts method of the GraphicsEnvironment class returns an array of all font faces available in the system. These font faces are returned as Font objects with a size of 1, identity transform and default font features.

These base fonts can then be used to derive new Font objects with varying sizes, styles, transforms and font features via the deriveFont methods in this class. This makes some operations, such as rendering underlined text, convenient since it is not necessary to explicitly construct a TextLayout object. Attributes can be set on a Font by constructing or deriving it using a Map of TextAttribute values.

The values of some TextAttributes are not serializable, and therefore attempting to serialize an instance of Font that has such values will not serialize them. This means a Font deserialized from such a stream will not compare equal to the original Font that contained the non-serializable attributes.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. In my JavaFX application, the user will have the possibility to choose the font or font family for displaying the menus, labels, combo boxes, check boxes etc. Where can I find the different font families available for JavaFX 8?

You can get the list of installed font families by calling javafx. Personally I would attach a CSS sheet to your program, in that case you can set the default font family using.

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Learn more. Asked 4 years, 7 months ago. Active 1 year, 11 months ago. Viewed 36k times. Ugurcan Yildirim 4, 2 2 gold badges 25 25 silver badges 54 54 bronze badges. Guido Guido 2 2 gold badges 8 8 silver badges 18 18 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes. Ugurcan Yildirim Ugurcan Yildirim 4, 2 2 gold badges 25 25 silver badges 54 54 bronze badges. Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook.

Sign up using Email and Password. Post as a guest Name. Email Required, but never shown. The Overflow Blog. Podcast Programming tutorials can be a real drag.The set of supported locales varies between different implementations of the Java Platform Standard Edition Java SE as well as between different areas of functionality.

The installers will use the use the system's default locale setting to determine which of the supported languages to use at the time of installation. If the system's default locale is not supported by the installer, the installer will be displayed in English.

java 8 font

The support for locale-sensitive behavior in the java. The only platform dependent functionality is the setting of the initial default locale and the initial default time zone based on the host operating system's locale and time zone. Implicit default scripts are in parentheses.

They are not returned from the Locale. Locales can be constructed with Locale.

Supported Fonts

Locales can be constructed only with Locale. Numbering systems can be specified by a language tag with a numbering system ID, such as th-TH-u-nu-thai.

The following are the available numbering system IDs for specifying a numbering system. Refer to java. BreakIterator and Collator data are not adopted. ROOT locale are used if none of the specified locale providers support the requested locale. For the Java Foundation Classes AWT, Swing, 2D, input method framework, drag and drop and JavaFX, locales can generally be characterized by just the writing system; there are no country or language specific distinctions.

Peered AWT components are only supported for a subset of the writing systems - see the last column. Support for text input consists of two parts: interpretation of keyboard layouts, and text composition using input methods.

Package java.text

For interpretation of keyboard layouts, the JDK relies entirely on the host operating system. For text composition using input methods, JDK supports native input methods using the host operating system's input method manager as well as input methods developed in the Java programming language excluding JavaFX environment.

Locale support in input methods implemented in the Java programming language depends solely on the set of installed input methods, not on the host operating system and its localization. However, support for the use of input methods implemented in the Java programming language with peered components is implementation dependent - see below.

Input methods implemented in the Java programming language are supported in all components but JavaFX nodes, on all versions of Windows. The JRE supports use of any keyboard layout or input method that can be used with a particular Solaris or Linux locale.

Input methods implemented in the Java programming language are supported in lightweight components such as Swing text componentsbut not in peered components such as AWT text components or JavaFX nodes.

When using logical font names, text in at least the writing system of the host locale and the Western European subset of the Latin writing system is supported. When using physical fonts, we need to distinguish between simple and complex writing systems. Simple writing systems have a one-to-one mapping from characters to glyphs, and glyphs are placed on the baseline continuously from left to right.

Complex writing systems may use different glyphs for the same character based on context, may form ligatures, may be written from right to left, and may reorder glyphs during line layout, or may have other rules for placing glyphs in particular for combining marks.

The 2D text rendering system supports any combination of simple writing systems and the complex writing systems listed in the table above. Within these limitations, the range of supported writing systems is determined by the font.

A single TrueType font might provide glyphs covering the entire Unicode character set and a Unicode based character-to-glyph mapping. Given such a font, 2D can support all simple writing systems as well as the complex writing systems shown in the table above.

Other complex writing systems are not supported. No precise list of supported font rendering locales can be provided since support is largely dependent on the installed platform fonts, and the complex text rendering capabilities of the native platform.

The automatic implicit addition of fallback fonts to all FX fonts other than application embedded fonts means that the application should benefit from the broadest locale support no matter which FX font is in use. When using logical font names, text in at least the writing system of the host operating system's locale is supported. Text rendering using the pluggable services printing API depends on the printing service used; the services provided by the JRE work to the same extent as text rendering on the screen.

On Windows Vista, 7, and 8, text using the entire Unicode character set can be transferred between applications. On Solaris and Linux, text in the character encoding of the host operating system's locale can be transferred between applications.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time.

Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I tried to load the inputstream to a temp file, but it does not help.

I also tried to load a font directly from a local file, but I got a different error with getting font metadata. Here is the error log. So, this is not a problem with inputstream, but rather with the loading of the font itself in JRE 8. I am loading a font to use to draw a string in a picture.

My code is run in a Docker container using images javajre okjavajdk okjavajre failjavajdk ok. I met with the same error in openjdkjre-alpine. Switching to openjdkjre also helped. We also got that error when using tomcat That image is missing the fontconfig. Instead of switching to a different image you could also install the ttf-dejavu package.

It turns out that this is a problem with the openjdkjre-headless installation. This is the installation in the Docker image for java 8 JRE. I simply install openjdkjre without headless and the problem goes away.

If you look at the error log, the loading of the font require awt X11, which is missing from headless version of JRE. Also one might need to install at least one font dejavuliberationetc. Learn more. Asked 4 years, 10 months ago. Active 10 months ago. Viewed 13k times. IOException: Problem reading font data.These classes are capable of formatting dates, numbers, and messages, parsing; searching and sorting strings; and iterating over characters, words, sentences, and line breaks.

This package contains three main groups of classes and interfaces: Classes for iteration over text Classes for formatting and parsing Classes for string collation Since: JDK1. That documentation contains more detailed, developer-targeted descriptions, with conceptual overviews, definitions of terms, workarounds, and working code examples.

All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms. Also see the documentation redistribution policy. Skip navigation links. An Annotation object is used as a wrapper for a text attribute value if the attribute has annotation characteristics. The BreakIterator class implements methods for finding the location of boundaries in text. The CollationElementIterator class is used as an iterator to walk through each character of an international string.

A CollationKey represents a String under the rules of a specific Collator object. The Collator class performs locale-sensitive String comparison. Defines constants that are used as attribute keys in the AttributedCharacterIterator returned from DateFormat. DateFormatSymbols is a public class for encapsulating localizable date-time formatting data, such as the names of the months, the names of the days of the week, and the time zone data.

DecimalFormat is a concrete subclass of NumberFormat that formats decimal numbers. This class represents the set of symbols such as the decimal separator, the grouping separator, and so on needed by DecimalFormat to format numbers.

FieldPosition is a simple class used by Format and its subclasses to identify fields in formatted output. Format is an abstract base class for formatting locale-sensitive information such as dates, messages, and numbers. Defines constants that are used as attribute keys in the AttributedCharacterIterator returned from Format.

MessageFormat provides a means to produce concatenated messages in a language-neutral way. Defines constants that are used as attribute keys in the AttributedCharacterIterator returned from MessageFormat.

This class provides the method normalize which transforms Unicode text into an equivalent composed or decomposed form, allowing for easier sorting and searching of text. Defines constants that are used as attribute keys in the AttributedCharacterIterator returned from NumberFormat. ParsePosition is a simple class used by Format and its subclasses to keep track of the current position during parsing.

The RuleBasedCollator class is a concrete subclass of Collator that provides a simple, data-driven, table collator. SimpleDateFormat is a concrete class for formatting and parsing dates in a locale-sensitive manner. This enum provides constants of the four Unicode normalization forms that are described in Unicode Standard Annex 15 — Unicode Normalization Forms and two methods to access them.


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